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Appearance over Ability – Customs at the Medical Schools

Submitted by on August 21, 2012 – 3:44 AM 100 Comments

My university judges me on the way I dress, the way I talk and the way I present myself in public. My university doesn’t allow me to be myself; they want to robotically program their ideals; they don’t want to hone my uniqueness, my talent nor my ideals. They want me to be a monkey that follows the master’s commands.

I am the frustrated student of a medical school in Pakistan who feels imprisoned; I am a student that wishes to explore his ideals and his beliefs rather than having them imposed on me. I am a student that wishes to have the ability to explore more than just books and medical journals; I am a student that wishes to be educated rather than being forced to memorize all the books in the medical library.
A fairly able student ties her hair back, puts on glasses and wears clothes that do not resemble what she would wear on a normal day. She puts on this costume of innocence to squeeze a couple of marks in the viva; this theatrical performance never made sense to me. I never gave in to such customs: My wrinkled lab coat gets a deathly stare from my examiners and my un-tucked T-shirt gives me the hearing of a second class citizen.

 

I stare down judgmental eyes as I enter the exam room; I now realize nobody without a dress pant and a collared shirt can ever be respected nor can they ever be knowledgeable. My honesty gets chastised; I am expected to perform a Broadway show complete with costumes. This monotony of clothing hides my personality and my individuality let alone forcing me to lie.

 

How do my clothes reflect my knowledge or my ability? Why should I wear clothes forced upon by hypocritical cultural standards? Sure someone will pass the argument of appropriate attire for an examination hall and the frail respect that represents; let me take this argument outside the examination hall. Let’s enter the gates of the university where as soon as I enter, a person is breathing down my neck asking “beta, where is your lab coat?” How does the lab coat influence my ability to study?

 

I understand a lab coat in a hospital setting where it serves as an identification tool for doctors. How does a lab coat bring anything but hindrance to the typical student especially in the burning temperatures that befall Karachi? Then let’s continue on to the ever judgmental eyes if one ever wears slippers or shorts to university. Slippers are easy to put on every morning and shorts are comfortable to wear in the heat.

 

Why should one be forced to merely “look” professional, through a dress pant, collared shirt and a lab coat, to appease the judgmental eyes of our society? My idea of professionalism comes from my ability and willingness to perform not from the clothes I pick out of my closet. This reliance on appearance needs to stop, the judgment needs to stop, and abilities need to be judged not my wardrobe collection.

 

When my wardrobe is judged and not my abilities, it proves to me that the world doesn’t care if my abilities are up to task as long as I present myself well. It proves to me that it’s ok to use my appearance to trick the unsuspecting individual.
Education, as defined by psychology, is a relative change in behavior due to something learnt or acquired. This definition highlights what our medical education doesn’t provide. Our medical education doesn’t introduce us to the unusual (I’m not talking about pathological cases), and it doesn’t force us to explore areas that we are uncomfortable with.

 

Our by the book education system doesn’t explore anything other than what’s provided in the text; they expect us to memorize, not learn. A simple English class in my former school, the Karachi American School, Karachi, Pakistan, we questioned religion, we questioned values and we questioned beliefs. This discussion sometimes unsettled me but it made me tolerant and understanding.

 

Similarly education abroad introduces everyone to different cultures, societies and quite simply different ways of life. What does this simple fact do? It introduces us to people with different religions and different customs that completely differ from our personal experience. This changes our own behavior where we start to realize that there are other ways of life, other ways to exist.

 

This increased level of tolerance and understanding is education. The realization that we aren’t always right is education. To attain such a level of education we don’t need foreign students as that may be an impossible feat in a country like Pakistan.

 

We need inspirational teachers who can question us to our fundamentals and a level of security that keeps us safe. We need teachers that dare to explore the taboo, however, unsettling it may be. We need a secure environment that promotes our ability to question not chastise it as we are students of science.

 

I, for one, don’t feel safe expressing my differing opinions in the fear that the college monarchy will crush me. This should not be the way of a university that is so geared towards science and yet we don’t follow its fundamental law: Don’t take anything for granted and question everything. We need a university that can help us grow as people not just grow our medical knowledge through memorization for that will make us understanding doctors and in the end understanding people.
The medical education here gives us the information to become successful, by the book, doctors but it never teaches us any morals or ethics. It doesn’t give us any freedom to explore the world and punishes us when we ask otherwise. The university supposedly basis its ideas on science and exploration but neither does it let us question nor explore; how can we name this a medical university? The university has to become more open to foreign ideas and has to let its student explore venues other than what is presented in the curriculum. This scientific university needs to promote the philosophical mind, not suppress it like a forgotten memory.

 

About the author: Nauman Hashmani is a medical student at Dow Medical College, Karachi, Pakistan. He is an aspiring writer and wants to challenge the culture of his society. He can be reached at: [email protected]

About this article: This article is competing for the JPMS International Medical Writing Contest 2012 for the theme: Medical Education

 

To learn more about the contest and to participate in it, follow this link:http://blogs.jpmsonline.com/writing-contest/

 

To support the author win this contest, share and like this article at different social media platform using the social icons given in this page. Please note the rules and regulations for this contest for details. Last date for submissions extended to September, 20, 2012.

 

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  • Dr Aroon kamath

    Well done! I sincerely loved your blog. Good luck!!

    • Nauman Hashmani

      Glad you liked it!

  • Dr Aroon kamath

    Dear
    Nauman, Your article is thought provoking, no doubt. The “dress code” for doctors has evolved through many centuries. If the community at large, accepts that an experienced and trustworthy doctor may dress as he/she pleases, there should be no problem. One may easily imagine how a doctor (or a nurse) would prefer to dress in the arctic or the antarctic! All attires may not be “comfortable” in a place where one lives and works. Some “socially and environmentally acceptable” changes are worth considering. Thank you for a thought provoking blog!

    • Nauman Hashmani

      Thank you. My point was that we shouldn’t judge anyone based on appearance be it a doctor or a medical student. I want to break this culture. Your comments are appreciated!

      • Guest

        good :)

        • Nauman Hashmani

          :)

  • Taimur Jahangir

    A completely valid argument. Nice work Nauman!

    • Nauman Hashmani

      Surely it is! thanks!

  • jaish

    Slippers are easy to put on every morning and shorts are comfortable to wear in the heat… this point i like most in whole article your idea is really creative….. may your this article wil effect our society…….keep going man, god bless u

    • Nauman Hashmani

      Thanks I’m glad you liked it!

  • Haris Shaikh

    you nailed it bro. brilliant stuff.

    • Nauman Hashmani

      thanks!

  • Ali Khaliq

    your thought provoking idea is awesum bro . . . .excellent :)

    • Nauman Hashmani

      thanks!

  • Saad Farooq

    The costume of innocence people put up during viva to gain extra marks is something which happens universally and even during a job interview.. But i strongly agree that it reflects neither your knowledge nor ability..

    • Nauman Hashmani

      Yes I am aware of that but this was a critique of our medical institutions not of the the global culture. I would’ve commented on that as well but I did not have a chance and yes I am against that also.

  • Arsalan

    Well thought and laid out article. I like the ideas presented and agree with you in that something needs to be done about the culture of thinking “within the box.”

    • Nauman Hashmani

      Surely there does. Glad you liked it!

  • mazhar

    great work boy !

    • Nauman Hashmani

      thanks!

  • zia

    Great idea Nauman :)

    • Nauman Hashmani

      Thanks!

  • Longterm Effects

    The parallel you described between doing a show and dressing for school is very interesting. You do raise some strong points. However, you should keep in mind that the medical field is of a professional nature and part of professionalism is the image you portray. And your image is a representation of who you are i.e. wrinkly clothes means that you are too lazy to iron, do people really want to go to professionals and doctors who seem lazy in their work. Therefore, it is a representation of your work ethic. This is the reason why your patients will undermine you. Do you really think patients will come see you, if you look like you haven’t taken a shower for 4 days? They will question your hygiene – and you out of all people should know how important hygiene is to doctors.

    Keep in mind that this notion of appearance is not just in your society. Even BUSINESS schools across the globe have a dress code. Furthermore, your school imposes this dress code policy so that these habits will stay with you in the workforce as well. They are not trying to run a monarchy, just trying to prepare you.

    Just something to think about…

    • Nauman Hashmani

      I am very aware of this global culture and I understand the professionalism that you talk of. I like your points and I like that you’re taking this reading pretty seriously.

      Now for the long term effects. First of all the Monarchy that I mentioned wasn’t about the appearance factor but of the fact that I cannot speak my mind and nobody wants to hear my opinion. The monarchy that will crush me wasn’t about people telling me what to wear but people that won’t hear anything but what they are saying. This system never made sense to me in terms of opinion.

      Now for the business and professionalism you talk of. Hygiene is a completely different argument; notice how I never mentioned showering or keeping yourself clean. Secondly, the wrinkled lab coat and the laziness in ironing; why, especially in a schedule as hectic as a doctor, should I step out of my way to “portray” in image that satisfies you. I understand I need to seem professional and the collared shirt goes a long way to do that for me but I shouldn’t have to “show” professionalism in a studious environment where all the doctors are supposed to judge are my ability to recall information. Then also, the lab coat is the number one thing I don’t understand in my university where I have to wear it everyday to university, to classes and to labs. A lab coat is an identification tool however we all already are students and there’s no identification required.

  • Naila Asghar

    All the best!

    • Nauman Hashmani

      thanks!

  • Arsalan G

    good job with the essay! very intriguing ..

    • Nauman Hashmani

      glad you liked it!

  • Mohammed

    Good job. Nicely written article. Yes I totally agree with you but it , may be , take a long time to change this culture

    • Nauman Hashmani

      Surely it will.

  • Alizay Imran

    Great Job Nauman! Amazing points and it’s great to have someone speak up about the judgmental surrounding we have here. Good luck for the future. =)

    • Nauman Hashmani

      Thanks!

  • Zia ( ZUDN)

    Assalaam o alaikum nauman, I completely agree with you on the point
    about lab coats being much more of a hindrance pasting us with the
    gloomy heritage that has so long been a part of this university, and I
    support your argument that our teaching institutions should should
    respects an individuals talents rather than thrusting a philosophy of
    its own and one should be himself regardless what any one expects ,I will agree that every one grades on how we look but they fail to see our abilities,
    but at this moment I will state that this is the most demanding
    profession which not only demands a persons time, health , stress, but
    also his morals, his beliefs, and his aspirations,like it or not a I can’t just barge in to a clinic wearing thai shorts, hawayan shirts
    and sponge sandals just because I feel attached to it or I am
    comfortable with it, I have to be professional, disciplined and maintain
    the decorum of that institution which is its prestige, similarly you
    said about the interviews I can’t just walk up in front of the
    invigilator and say ” what up homey?” just because I am comfortable with
    it, that isn’t professional nor respectable, you have mentioned about
    wearing dress pants , lab coats, and nice clothes during the interview
    and I’m glad you have, wearing this type of an out fit does not merely
    mean that I am sucking up to the invigilator ( ALTHOUGH MOST STUDENTS IN
    OUR CLASS DO) but some students wear them to show that they have given
    importance to that interview , they have woke up late , studied hard,
    washed and ironed their clothes, polish their shoes, it signifies the
    importance that we have given to that interview. Nevertheless you have
    made a good point which maybe the voice of every student studying in our
    college, and I as a part totally respect, appreciate and support most
    of it, Nice Job Nauman.

    • Nauman Hashmani

      Notice how I made the argument here about wearing shorts and slippers to university not to a critical emergency case; I know we aren’t ready for that as a society yet. But What i don’t understand is, why are you associating my morals and my ethics based on the way I look? My morals and my ethics have nothing to do with how I dress. Also I do completely understand where you’re coming from with the whole khakhi shorts in a work environment and to a certain extent I agree. Thank you for a well informed reply. This is what I look for in readers.

  • Waqar Hassan

    I didnt care to read the whole article since even the first para busted my mind. So in your opininon one should wear and do what he wants to without any reservations but where is the chastity in that? I am a med student, my father is a renowned doctor (with the grace of God) and you know what i have learned from him? He would always inculcate this very idea in my mind that doctor is such profession that has some values. It is what it is, you need to be disciplined or there are other fields you should have gone for.

    • Nauman Hashmani

      I won’t care to give you an informed reply because you didn’t read my entire article and didn’t see where I was truly coming from. Read the entire article, try to see what I’m saying and then I’ll give you a reply based on the opinions you have. It’s insulting to an author to have someone say that you’ve judged his entire article based on the first few sentences. I spend time and effort trying to write this article so before you try criticizing my article for a lack of discipline please learn some respect for someone else’s work. Thank you.

      • Waqar Hassan

        Sorry to offend you Nauman, i didnt intend to but the article got on my nerves. And to the fact that your family is doctor, well my grand father was the first MBBS doctor during the brittish reign in the city of larkana (thats the city where my grandparents belong) and my two uncles, my two aunts, my two puffos, my sister, my three first cousins are doctor :p
        It seems i have to give a read…. Hey you really made an impression by saying “I spent time and effort trying to write this article”…. I apologize. :)

        • Nauman Hashmani

          So we’ve both established that we are from medical oriented families.
          I’m glad the article got on your nerves, that’s the point of writing. The point of writing is present differing opinion and differing values. What would be the point if everyone had the same exact views?
          I hope you give the article a read with an open mind.

          • Waqar Hassan

            Though i am big fan of this fictional character Dr House but you know at some level its your attitude that matters aswell along with the knowledge that you have. I mean have you seen the people in army? They are disciplined, sophisticated and they wear a uniform. Now if you just try to understand my perspective, not having uniform in the field of medicine do not allow us to wear something that is rather strange. Some day when you are going to be a professor and some random student comes for the Viva, the very thing that would appeal to your mind is the way he is dressed, why? What if he appears with T-Shirt having J-Lo’s portrait and skinny jeans instead of a formal dress pant and shirt? It does matter my friend. One will not want to go to a concert wearing Full Suit or to a meeting wearing shorts and T’s.Now i am not defying complete article of yours, you are right at many levels that one should not be chained into wearing some thing that does not defines there personality but if you let the students decide what they would want to wear, there are going to be some serious problem since students would start wearing things that are rather weird and soon enough we will have group of people that are unimaginably bizarre in there looks

          • Nauman Hashmani

            Now you said that your attitude matters. let me start of by saying my attitude is not defined by what I wear. Attitude is something that comes from within. Attitude is how you work and why you work not what your image is. Then you say the Army is disciplined and sophisticaed and they wear a uniform. I’m sure much of the army is but again the lack of the correct form of “attitude” in the Pakistan Army has led to one of the most corrupt armies in our history. This corruption is attitude not their uniform.

            Your second point is quite valid that what if a person wears bizarre clothes to an interview. Then let me ask you this: The said person is a medical student, someone who you will trust your life with and you can’t trust him to wear the right clothes to a test? My point isn’t let anyone wear anything, my point is give people choices. Set guidelines not rules as to what is the right thing to do and let people realize for themselves what approach they should take. Right now anything other than a dress pant is against the “rules”. Notice how theirs no choice, this is what I’m against.

    • Nauman Hashmani

      Oh and also my father is a renowned doctor, my brother is a doctor, my sister is a dentist and several of my cousins are doctors; so maybe I know a little bit about the culture of doctors as I’ve grown up around them my entire life.

  • Adil Ahmed Shekhani

    Nice Article And Good Job
    Keep It Up !!!!!!

    • Nauman Hashmani

      thanks!

  • Dr Azfar

    Cool down Nauman……white coat is just a dress code for doctors and med. students. Different professions have different dress codes, like lawyers, doctors,armed forces, etc. Clothing like other aspects of human physical apperance has a social significance and it conveys social messages, even if none is intended and thats natutral. Misinterpretation is natural when
    receiver’s code of interpretation differs from the sender’s code of communication, however during viva, examiner can easily judge if the student is capable and professionally sound. Nevertheless, costume of innocence always get more marks.

    • Nauman Hashmani

      I agree we have different dress codes for different professions but lets look at how that has helped us as a country. The “maulwi” today has his uniform. The Army today has their uniform. The doctors today have their uniform. How many of them follow what their uniform actually represent! We seem to be forgetting the values behind these uniforms and we are mere hiding behind the uniform themselves! What I am trying to promote is the sense of pride in your job and what you do. What I’m trying to say is do not award the costume of innocence, award innocence itself!

  • Arham

    i absolutely agree with you, science is supposed to be questioned but in our set up its all about memorizing everything. Good job :)

    • Nauman Hashmani

      Glad you liked it!

  • shahjee

    very nice nauman keep it up

    • Nauman Hashmani

      Thanks !

  • Siddique

    I liked the ideas presented. There is two distinct themes though; Yes you shouldn’t be judged based on the way you dress/present yourself but it’s only a way to help you prepare for the real world where first impression makes or breaks an interview & where your dress style could convey professionalism. Yes the grade on the Viva shouldn’t have your dressing style factored in but in the real world these things matter a lot.
    What I do agree with is the limitation on orthodox thinking; to not be able to talk about the taboos, or to not be able to challenge a doctor/professor even if he’s wrong.

    • Nauman Hashmani

      I don’t agree with the real world though, and that’s the problem. And even if they impose these in interview sessions, I don’t need 5 years to plan what I’m going to wear for an interview.

  • Saleem Naviwala

    Very well written and
    above all well expressed ideas. This has been a question and challenge of every
    new generation to old as well as controversy behind the tradition of uniform vs
    no uniform in schools. The arguments are also traditional and a cliché’. It is
    true that in US at university level or premed level there are no restrictions
    for dress code but when one enters an arena where one needs to comply to the
    norms for uniformity for various reasons. Judgment is the human dilemma that
    when one presents himself as a learned or doctor it raises expectation in the
    minds of those who put their trust in the hands of the one extends out himself
    as being learned. Therefore having to go through an exercise to comply to dress
    code standards in a medical university is understandable. Another reason is
    protection of self and others such as lab-coat and gloves also considered
    global precautions. But in any case questions raised by Dr. Naumani Hashmani
    are commendable and writing style is such that it enhances communication and
    understanding, which is very much needed in today’s world.

    Dr. Saleem Naviwala

    • Nauman Hashmani

      I don’t find many people here that find this argument cliche but I do agree with you it really does go back a long time. I did use this cliche as an example to make people realize some of the mistakes we’re making.

      Now I agree the judgement is a human dilemma but I disagree that the clothes show that he is learned or of another status. See many people wear the clothes that doctor’s wear, the collared shirt description, but not all of them are doctors. That isn’t even the main concern though; what you will notice when you go on trips with doctors in Pakistan is that all of them, regardless of situation, wear mostly the same clothes! It’s like an image that has to kept up! That I don’t understand! From such an early age this concept of learned appearance has been hammered into them that this is now their belief. I believe that beliefs should be for the individual to decide by guidance not imposed on them by the whip. Hope I made clear what I’m trying to say.

      Then I did agree in the article that the lab coat make sense in a hospital environment not a university environment.

      Any ways glad you enjoyed it!

  • Muneeb

    Great article. Very well presented argument.

    • Nauman Hashmani

      Thanks!

  • EmanA

    Very Well Done Nauman.
    …and something is definitely not right with Mr. Right as depicted by the comments he has put up without pay the article a good visit.

    • Nauman Hashmani

      Thank you! I’m sure he realized his mistake! He apologized and gave a thought out answer so I guess that counts for something! glad you liked it!

      • EmanA

        :)

  • http://www.facebook.com/maria.hash.5 Maria Hash

    brilliantly presented…many of us have the same thoughts while going through the medical years but never actually get time to write it down…the way you have written is just exceptional….

    • Nauman Hashmani

      Glad you liked it!

  • http://www.facebook.com/muhammad.parekh.7 Muhammad Parekh

    Amazingly presented…. well thought…BRAVO!

    • Nauman Hashmani

      Glad you liked it!

  • Rave

    Well-worded. I agree completely, your points about our society really hit home.

    • Nauman Hashmani

      Great! I’m glad you enjoyed it!

  • Fahham

    Although a certain amount of decency is good but yes the restrictions are too many and judgments made very wrong . Good article!

    • Nauman Hashmani

      See “decency” has a different meaning to different individuals. What you may deem decent is not decent to another family or culture. We shouldn’t be trying to lock in what one group of people believe in an entire society. Let the students who are all proven brilliant academics decide for themselves what this word actually means to them; imposing doesn’t help me think!

  • http://www.facebook.com/aimen.mustafa Aimen Mustafa

    Assalam o alaikum …

    i liked the way u interpreted the whole concept … that is actually the main issue most of our class is facing … restrictions on lab coat or judgmental eyes .. etc

    but as one of my teacher said that just like coming to college regularly is a good thing (but in a long run) … how ??
    will just enhance your punctuality when u will be actually needed by the real patients … similarly the concept goes with restriction on wearing lab coat … next time when u will be going to attend a patient it is because of these restrictions that u had .. u will ultimately have a habit of wearing lab coat … (that is the only reason i can evaluate by the restrictions )
    and about judging … that is kind of human nature to judge people by their appearance … although as u mentioned that is indeed a bad concept to judge a person by his/her appearance without evaluating their abilities …
    NICE JOB ..

    • Nauman Hashmani

      I don’t agree about punctuality. It’s a lab coat, it takes me 2 seconds or less to wear. I don’t need to practice such a minimal thing. Its more a concept of trying to control the students and teaching them the values of what the “university” deems right; its an imposing mechanism.

      Secondly its not human to judge by appearance, its just something that our culture, globally, has picked up over the years for whatever reason. People are more than what they appear to be. And I’m glad you liked it!

  • Zoya

    Great outspoken article :) And I think the judgmental eyes belong to people who love being in charge and setting these “rules” to let us know that they are. That’s just a way of them bossing around :/

    • Nauman Hashmani

      Well it’s not just a way to control its a mechanism by which we want to make people who we think they should be instead of what they could be.

  • Maaez Veqar

    very well written.. great content; definitely speaks for the other frustrated students

    • Nauman Hashmani

      I know and I’m glad you liked it!

  • http://www.facebook.com/naveed.imran.100 Naveed Imran

    well written and sadly true

    • Nauman Hashmani

      Thanks man!… Sadly yes!

  • samar

    Although I’m not a medical student, I have quite a few friends studying in DOW like you. I really agree with your ideas and I think that these things need to be changed

    • Nauman Hashmani

      I’m glad you agree and it really does need a change.

  • Bilal Channah

    Very nicely written and im sure these thoughts are shared by most medical students! good job!

    • Nauman Hashmani

      I’m sure they are! thanks!

  • http://www.facebook.com/muhammad.usama.39 Muhammad Usama

    nice one.i m also fed up with all the rubbish we have to face at our respective schools and more particularly obeying those rules and regulations.they only want us to read books not implement those books upon ourselves

    • Nauman Hashmani

      I’m with you. I’ll go further and say that we aren’t even completely understanding those books and hence aren’t utilizing their full potential.

  • Sylar!

    Ur just lazy bro :p … though the piece is well written … !!

    • Nauman Hashmani

      No idea if I should take this seriously … Glad you liked how its written though!

  • Adeel

    nice work!!

    • Nauman Hashmani

      Thanks I appreciate it!

  • http://www.facebook.com/muhammad.parekh.7 Muhammad Parekh

    amazingly wirrten..! bravo

    • Nauman Hashmani

      Thanks!

  • Zainab

    Very nicely written!! Feels like someone has stolen my thoughts :) good work!!

    • Nauman Hashmani

      I’m Glad you agree! Thanks!

  • http://www.facebook.com/hiba.jaliawala.7 Hiba Jaliawala

    Simply Amazing- Loved it :D

    • Nauman Hashmani

      Thanks!

  • yumna shams

    great wok nauman .. u’ve drawn our attensions towards the thing which really matters in a doctor’s life … people here are much more concerned about our appearance rather than our ability .. which should really be changed … GOOD

    • Nauman Hashmani

      I know it really does need to change.. Thanks!

  • http://www.facebook.com/abdulahparekh Abdullah Parekh

    tremendous article !! quiet intersting too !!

    • Nauman Hashmani

      Thank you!

  • http://www.facebook.com/rabika15 Rabika Aslam

    It is well written…and I do agree with a lot of your points! Good Job! There is a lot of issues that Pakistan needs to work on and this is definitely one of them.

    • Nauman Hashmani

      Thank you and I’m glad you agree!

  • hza

    glad someone finally wrote about something like this

  • hina rajani

    problem worth to be pondered…well written..only few dare to jot it down.

  • zainab ali

    interesting..good job !

  • http://twitter.com/mallick_fa fiya

    Nice article. Its really frustrating to be judged in all ways and I think problem is not with the medical school its our society which is highly prejudiced and intolerant……..But If you ask me Its good there is some kind of dress code.what If someone likes wearing leaves.Its his choice and he has a right as an individual but It would be extremely uncomfortable for others.We are not alone in this world and tolerance is not doing whatever you want.Its about respecting(not accepting) others point of views as well even If we dont agree .even If Its a bit painful.But yeah apart from that I agree our education system is producing tamed professionals who are discouraged at every step to think out of the box or beyond norms.We are narrow-minded and too insecure as a society.We are afraid we will lose our faith, identity culture If we talk about others.Though I believe knowing others just makes you know yourself better.